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This report will help you evaluate if you are being paid a fair amount for the responsibilities you are shouldering. In addition, EHS managers can find the information to keep their departments competitive and efficient—an easy way to guarantee you are paying the right amount to retain hard-to-fill positions but not overpaying on others.

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The environment, health, and safety (EHS) field is in the midst of change. Job responsibilities are shifting, there are younger employees joining the workforce, and you are being asked to do more with less.

As an EHS professional, it’s hard to tell if you are being paid competitively, and as an employer, it’s hard to tell if you are offering salaries that are competitive and efficient. This report clears up some of that confusion.

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May 18, 2017
Flint, Michigan’s water system is improving

The results from the Extended Sentinel Site testing for Flint, Michigan’s water system have tested below the action levels of the federal Lead and Copper Rule (LCR). In its eighth round, the latest testing shows the majority of all the Tier I samples are below 15 parts per billion (ppb), which is the federal action level.

As an EHS professional, it’s hard to tell if you are being paid competitively, and as an employer, it’s hard to tell if you are offering salaries that are competitive and efficient. For a Limited Time we’re offering a FREE copy of the 2017 EHS Salary Guide! Download Now

These latest testing results from April 2017 show 90 percent of Tier I samples at or below 6 ppb and 94.9 percent of the samples at or below 15 ppb. The federal standard calls for at least 90 percent to be at or below 15 ppb. A Tier I site is considered at higher risk per federal guidelines. This includes homes that have a lead service line or meet other criteria that make it an eligible location to determine compliance with the federal LCR.

Keith Creagh, director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and former interim director of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) states, “The city’s water is one of the most monitored systems in the U.S. with respect to lead, and the results are comparable to cities with similar size and age of infrastructure in Michigan and across the nation.”

However, state officials continue to recommend that all Flint residents use water filters provided by the state in areas where construction activities are taking place to remove service lines.

For more information about filter usage, call 810-238-6700.

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