You are not logged in
State:
Recent Updates Sent to Your Inbox
Latest What's New E-mail
Regulatory Analysis
We are continually updating our state and national regulatory analysis to help you keep up with the changing regs. See the updated section on the what's new page to find all of the topics.
Recent Regulatory Activity
New Documents
News:
Responding to seven petitions for reconsideration—all from industry—the EPA is proposing four amendments to regulations it issued in 2013, which themselves amended the Agency’s 2011 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and emission guidelines (EG) for commercial and industrial solid waste incineration (CISWI) units.
The new year is here, and with it, reporting season has arrived. The Tier II chemical inventory report is due on March 1. This article is a brief look at what must be included in the report and what are some of the things that do no need to be reported.
The U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has determined that EPA’s registered uses of the pesticide active ingredients diflubenzuron, fenbutatin oxide, and propargite are likely to jeopardize the survival of many species of Pacific salmon.
In response to requests for reconsideration from industry and environmental groups, the EPA is proposing amendments to two linked sets of National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) covering industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers at both area sources and major sources of HAPs.
In the latest action in its decade-long effort to reduce exposure of the American public to certain long-chain perfluorochemicals (PFCs), the EPA is proposing a significant new use rule (SNUR) for one of two PFC subcategories of chemicals, called long-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (LCPFAC).
The deadline to submit Tier II reports is March 1. Do you know your state’s reporting requirements? Use this map to find out.
A 2010 hydraulic shock accident at a food refrigeration facility in Theodore, Alabama, near Mobile Bay, prompted the U.S. Chemical Safety Board (CSB) to issue a new safety bulletin detailing the reasons for the failure and recommendations on how to avoid similar incidents.
Based on “complete, certified, and quality-assured” monitored air quality data for 2011–2013, the EPA has issued its initial air quality designations for most areas in the United States under the 2012 primary annual fine particle (PM-2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).
The EPA recently released its enforcement annual results for fiscal year (FY) 2014. EPA’s enforcement of the nation’s environmental laws is focused on water, air, and chemical hazards.
The EPA recently released its enforcement annual results for fiscal year (FY) 2014. EPA’s enforcement of the nation’s environmental laws is focused on water, air, and chemical hazards.
The use of chemical products to disperse the nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill prompted the EPA to reconsider regulations affecting how such products receive and maintain federal approval.
In a move that will reduce the cost of complying with federal lead-based paint (LBP) renovation, repair, and painting (RRP) standards, the EPA is proposing to eliminate the hands-on training requirement for refresher training for renovators.
The Obama administration announced a new goal to lower methane emissions from the oil and gas (O&G) sector by 40 percent to 45 percent by 2025 when compared to 2012 levels.
Using its authority under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the EPA is proposing a significant new use rule (SNUR) for seven toluene diisocyanates (TDIs) and related compounds.
New federal labeling requirements may be in the works for chlorpyrifos, one of the most durable broad-spectrum pesticides used worldwide.
After a long wait, the EPA has issued the Coal Combustion Residual Final Rule concerning the disposal of coal ash.
White Papers:
A designation by EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) or by a state that a contaminated site has been cleaned up should provide the public and businesses with assurance that the site is ready for anticipated use (RAU) and is protective for people (PFP).
President Obama signed into law was much needed legislation covering DHS's program to ensure that dangerous chemicals that are manufactured, stored, or processed at industrial facilities will not be used by terrorists to attack the people, environment, and infrastructure of the United States.
On October 31, 2014, 29 federal agencies released their final climate change adaptation plans.
Guidance Documents:
Use this chart to check your state’s Tier II reporting requirements and find contact information.
Abby Ferri, a Certified Safety Professional and an independent safety and health expert with previous experience managing EHS programs in the construction industry, discusses EPA’s rule on solvent-contaminated wipes. This webinar examines final rule changes, strategies for achieving maximum economic benefits from the changes, approaches for full compliance, and more.
Brad Harbaug, editor of the Environmental Health and Safety Blog for MSDSonline and creator of creator of MSDSonline’s GHS Answer Center and GHS Webinar series, discusses employee training concerning old MSDSs and new SDSs. This webinar examines Safety Data Sheets, training, and the role classification plays in GHS.
Doug Ruhlin, an expert in environmental matters pertaining to the concrete and construction materials industries, discusses compliance regarding the construction and development point source final rule. This webinar examines NPDES construction activity general permits, the existing rule, and the final rule changes.
Michael Lawrence, principal of Summit Safety Technologies based in Long Beach, California with more than 30 years of experience in safety management, discusses universal waste compliance. This webinar examines the universal waste rule; requirements for handling, storing, and shipping; universal waste streams; recycling and more.
Gery P. Giannini, CET, CIT, MTM, Director of Safety Sales & Training at Heritage Group Safety, discusses asbestos operations and maintenance programs. This webinar examines background to asbestos regulation, potential health risks from asbestos, consultation, and more.
Michael Easter, a toxicologist, attorney, and Certified Hazardous Materials Manager with more than 20 years of experience, discusses hazardous materials release and storage reporting. This webinar examines the relationship between CERCLA and EPCRA, EPCRA organization, recent changes, and more.
Tom Burgess, a certified safety professional with more than 25 years of experience including industrial fire brigades, maintenance of fire detection and suppression systems, and more, discusses the Flammable Liquid Standard. This webinar examines what a flammable liquid is, storing flammable liquids safely, flammable storage cabinets, and more.
On December 18, 2014, CEQ released revised draft guidance for public comment that describes how Federal departments and agencies should consider the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change in their NEPA reviews.
In December 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency modified its 2008 Definition of Solid Waste (DSW),which addresses the management of hazardous secondary materials (HSM) for recycling. This chart compares the 2008 rule with the new rule, which will take effect in 2015.
Questions & Answers:
40 CFR 112.1(d)(5) states that (d)"Except as provided in paragrapph(f) of this section, this part down not apply to: (5) Any container with a storage capacity of less that 55 gallons of oil. Does this include oil filled operational equipment(Hydraulic units)? Meaning do we need to include hydraulic units smaller than 55 gallons of oil in our plan for specific sources?
Under the Solvent Contaminated Wipe Rule: "Wipes may be accumulated by the generator for up to 180 days prior to being sent for cleaning or disposal". Does this mean we accumulate and send for disposal within 180 days? or accumulate for 180 days and can store on site for another amount of time?
If my site accumulates a 55 gallon drum of waste over an extended period, lets say, 6 months, and when it is manifested, it weighs 400 lbs. Since that one shipment is greater than 220 lbs (CESQG wise), can that site take the average of that weight manifested, which is 66.66 lbs per month, and still keep our CESQG status? We are wanting to know if this is adequate documentation and if this is legal for keeping our CESQG status.
What is the best way to calculate monthly hazardous waste generation without having to weigh each waste accumulation drum each month?
Our plant generates about one 55 gallon drum of waste at a time. When it is manifested, it weighs 400 pounds. Can we average that weight per month and still remain a CESQG?
Our company is a 3rd party warehouse company. We have various customers and each one holds their own EPA ID number at our site. One customer is a LQG. Are there any regulations that specifiy that both us and our customer must submit the biennially report? Or more importantly showing that only one report is sufficient?
This DOT violation, Case/Ticket #: 13T-0048-SDIBC-CE, raised the following questions: What type of protective cap must be placed on aerosols if you don't remove the nozzle? Can you provide an example? Is this the case if the aerosols are shipped in a 55 gallon drum? or only if shipped loosely? Case/Ticket #: 13T-0048-SDIBC-CE: (1) Offered and transported waste aerosols, in UN certified combination packagings without removing the nozzlesor having a protective cap placed on the aerosol can. , (2) Offered hazardous materials in UN-certified combination packages and composite intermediate bulk containers that were not closed in accordance with the manufacturer'sclosure notification. , (3) Offered and transported hazardous materials in UN standard intermediate bulk containers and failed to mark the packages with the proper UN identification number of the material. , (4) Offered multiple liquid hazardous materials in an overpack that was not properly marked with the orientation arrows.
Are car batteries exempt from Tier II reporting? Are batteries used in semi trucks used for the purpose of transporting goods exempt? If not, what regulations applies?
Updated Documents
Guidance Documents:
Use this chart to check your state’s Tier II reporting requirements and find contact information.
Abby Ferri, a Certified Safety Professional and an independent safety and health expert with previous experience managing EHS programs in the construction industry, discusses EPA’s rule on solvent-contaminated wipes. This webinar examines final rule changes, strategies for achieving maximum economic benefits from the changes, approaches for full compliance, and more.
Brad Harbaug, editor of the Environmental Health and Safety Blog for MSDSonline and creator of creator of MSDSonline’s GHS Answer Center and GHS Webinar series, discusses employee training concerning old MSDSs and new SDSs. This webinar examines Safety Data Sheets, training, and the role classification plays in GHS.
Doug Ruhlin, an expert in environmental matters pertaining to the concrete and construction materials industries, discusses compliance regarding the construction and development point source final rule. This webinar examines NPDES construction activity general permits, the existing rule, and the final rule changes.
Michael Lawrence, principal of Summit Safety Technologies based in Long Beach, California with more than 30 years of experience in safety management, discusses universal waste compliance. This webinar examines the universal waste rule; requirements for handling, storing, and shipping; universal waste streams; recycling and more.
Gery P. Giannini, CET, CIT, MTM, Director of Safety Sales & Training at Heritage Group Safety, discusses asbestos operations and maintenance programs. This webinar examines background to asbestos regulation, potential health risks from asbestos, consultation, and more.
Michael Easter, a toxicologist, attorney, and Certified Hazardous Materials Manager with more than 20 years of experience, discusses hazardous materials release and storage reporting. This webinar examines the relationship between CERCLA and EPCRA, EPCRA organization, recent changes, and more.
Tom Burgess, a certified safety professional with more than 25 years of experience including industrial fire brigades, maintenance of fire detection and suppression systems, and more, discusses the Flammable Liquid Standard. This webinar examines what a flammable liquid is, storing flammable liquids safely, flammable storage cabinets, and more.
On December 18, 2014, CEQ released revised draft guidance for public comment that describes how Federal departments and agencies should consider the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change in their NEPA reviews.
In December 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency modified its 2008 Definition of Solid Waste (DSW),which addresses the management of hazardous secondary materials (HSM) for recycling. This chart compares the 2008 rule with the new rule, which will take effect in 2015.
This document is used to assist in complying with the Standards of Performance for Stationary Compression Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (NSPS Subpart IIII)
Mark Howard is an environmental scientist with the EPA Office of Emergency Management in the Regulation and Policy Development Division. In this webinar, Howard examines SPCC history, gives a basic overview, and describes SPCC enforcement and common violations.
Laura Casey, a Certified Safety Professional with more than 17 years in the EHS field, discusses Multi-Sector General Permits. In this webinar, Casey reviews the current law, identifies if your facility requires a NPDES permit, examines regulatory updates, examines proposed changes to the MSGP, and more.
Faith Gavin Kuhn is the Director of Regulatory Affairs and Communications for the Associated Builders and Contractors of Connecticut, and Executive Director of the Utility Contractors Association of Connecticut. Amanda Czepiel, J.D., is the Managing Editor for BLR’s environmental team and is a legal expert regarding stormwater. In this webinar, Czepiel and Gavin Kuhn identify best practices for site compliance, how to prevent enforcement actions, explain how to deal with unexpected occurrences at your site, and more.
These FAQs are intended to help economic operators interpret the provisions of RoHS 2 in order to ensure compliance with the Directive’s requirements. They are considered a ‘living document’ and are currently revised in order to align them with the new Commission Blue Guide on the implementation of EU product rules.
Michael Easter, a toxicologist, attorney, and Certified Hazardous Materials Manager with more than 20 years of experience, discusses Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) statute, regulations and background. In addition, this webinar examines new and existing chemicals of TSCA Title I.
Abby Ferri, a Certified Safety Professional and an independent safety and health expert with previous experience managing EHS programs in the construction industry, discusses Aboveground Storage Tanks and gives an overview of SPCC regulations. This webinar examines key EPA studies, SPCC revised Guidance for Regional Inspectors, adequate secondary containment, and more.
Michael Easter, a toxicologist, attorney, and Certified Hazardous Materials Manager with more than 20 years of experience, discusses the relationship between CERCLA and EPCRA. This webinar examines CERCLA reporting requirements; EPCRA organization, obligations and reporting requirements; and EPCRA’s recent changes.
Laura Casey, a Certified Safety Professional with more than 17 years in the EHS field, reviews the existing federal requirements and regulations concerning USTs. This webinar examines key proposed changes, reviews dates for adoption and compliance, and explores potential strategies for future compliance.
Laura Casey, a Certified Safety Professional with more than 17 years in the EHS field, discusses what you need to know for the March Tier II filing deadline. This webinar examines the facility/owner requirements and obligations under EPCRA. In addition, this webinar defines Tier I & II reporting and reviews recent changes made to the Tier II reporting form and identifies sources for specific state information and resources available.
The DOT has issued non-site-specific special permits to companies for handling waste related to the Ebola virus.
This guidance is intended for persons who prepare packages containing waste contaminated or suspected of being contaminated with Ebola, for transportation to off-site treatment and disposal.
Regulatory Analysis:
The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires federal agencies to integrate environmental values into their decision-making processes through environmental impact assessment. Generally, NEPA requirements are triggered whenever a federal permit, federal monies, or a federal agency is involved in a project. The determination for further compliance with NEPA requirements is dependent on the presence of sensitive environments, conditions, or habitats evaluated through an initial environmental assessment (EA).
Making a hazardous waste determination is the key to the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management regulations. One of the most frequently asked questions by generators is, "Is my waste a hazardous waste regulated under RCRA?" If the answer is "no," the RCRA hazardous waste laws and regulations do not apply to the management of that waste. If the answer is "yes," however, the generator and subsequent handlers of the hazardous waste must comply with myriad RCRA rules that are in place in order to ensure the safe management of the hazardous waste.
Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), wastes are separated into two broad categories: hazardous and nonhazardous. Hazardous wastes are regulated under Subtitle C and nonhazardous wastes are regulated under Subtitle D. RCRA Subtitle D was designed to assist waste management officials in developing and encouraging environmentally sound methods for the disposal of nonhazardous solid waste (RCRA Section 4001). EPA does not have enforcement authority under RCRA Subtitle D; regulation of solid waste is the responsibility of the states.
The September 11 attacks increased concerns that terrorists might target businesses that handle hazardous materials, such as chemical manufacturers. While site security at these facilities previously targeted the isolated intruder or vandal, 9/11 highlighted the possibility that chemicals might be released or stolen as international weaponry. Site protection was suddenly entwined with national security, leading both legislators and the industry to step forward and address this threat.
Air emissions permits are divided into two distinct categories: construction permits and operating permits. The applicability of various permitting programs within each category is dependent on the type and quantity of the pollutants emitted, the attainment status of the area where the source is located, and the date the source was constructed or modified. The quantity of emissions from a source will determine whether the source can be classified as a major source or if changes at the source can be classified as a major modification. Major sources must comply with federal construction and operating permit programs, most of which are administered at the state or local level.
This topic provides an overview of the reporting requirements of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), also known as Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA Title III). EPCRA requires regulated facilities that manufacture, use, or store certain amounts of hazardous chemicals to develop and implement emergency plans, report chemical inventories, and notify authorities in the event of a toxic release.
Several federal programs have been established to ensure that facilities take steps to prevent hazardous substance releases and oil spills, chemical accidents, and other emergencies, implement planning and preparedness requirements, and respond to environmental emergencies.
Toxic air pollutants, also known as HAPs, are those pollutants that are known or suspected to cause cancer, other serious health effects, or adverse environmental effects. Other health effects can include damage to the immune system, as well as neurological, reproductive, developmental, respiratory, and other health problems.
Added in the last 7 days
Updated in the last 14 days

Environmental Quick Links

 
eco
Codie