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Regulatory Activity
Stay up to date with regulatory information in your state. Here's where you can see all the final and proposed rules, and notices published in the federal and state registers within the last 7 days.
Recent Regulatory Activity
New Documents
News:
EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has released a draft document describing a “conceptual framework” or “tool” for evaluating urban resistance to climate change.
A Minnesota law that prohibits utilities from meeting state electricity demand with power from new plants that contribute to statewide carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions was found in violation of the Constitution’s dormant Commerce Clause because the law places an undue burden on interstate commerce.
After 40 years, the Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA) has been reformed in an effort to more effectively manage chemicals in this country and give EPA more authority to evaluate and mitigate the associated risks. This infographic summarizes the important points of TSCA reform.
A U.S. district judge in Wyoming has “set aside” the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) final rule imposing environmentally protective requirements on hydraulically fractured oil and gas (O&G) wells on federal and Indian lands.
“For the first time in 20 years, we are updating a national environmental statute,” said President Obama before signing the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act on Wednesday.
House Republicans have packaged their major criticisms of the federal regulatory system along with their solutions in a 57-page paper called A Better Way: Our Vision for a Confident America.
Today, President Barack Obama signed the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, which amends the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for the first time in 40 years.
There should be little difficulty understanding the pollutant effluent limits in the EPA’s final pretreatment standards for onshore unconventional oil and gas (UOG) extraction facilities because the limits are zero.
The resistance of pests and particularly weeds to agricultural chemicals is an accelerating problem in the United States and worldwide.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is proposing to renew its 50 existing nationwide permits (NWPs) and to add two new NWPs.

To minimize the impacts to surface water quality, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the states require that construction projects of a certain size follow stormwater regulations. One such regulatory measure for construction activities includes developing a stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP).

In a recent webinar, Natalie VanLiew, PE, Managing Consultant at Trinity Consultants, discussed the proposed amendments to EPA's Risk Management Program regulations, including the major changes, some smaller changes that could have large impacts, and what to expect in the upcoming months.
Following the U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to rule on their latest attack against EPA’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), many states, utilities, and energy associations and companies will need to decide if there are any other realistic legal challenges to the regulation.
Referencing an opinion by the U.S. Supreme Court, the EPA is proposing to remove a restriction on when a Clean Air Act (CAA) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit may be rescinded.
White Papers:
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an updated version of its guide “Release Detection for Underground Storage Tanks [USTs] and Piping: Straight Talk On Tanks,” which provides descriptions of release detection methods for tanks and piping, and includes information on the revised 2015 federal UST regulation.
Economic- and community-based revitalization of America’s brownfields is one of the few major environmental issues not hamstrung by party politics.
In assessing the potential impact of its Clean Power Plan (CPP)—and other major rules affecting the electric power sector—the EPA has relied heavily on modeling performed by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).
Guidance Documents:
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (2/10/2015): Medical Surveillance for workers performing Class III asbestos work
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (12/1/2009): Drilling through asbestos-containing floor tile
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (6/12/2009): Comprehensive asbestos building surveys
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (3/1/2007): Clarification of decontamination procedures for employees involved in Class I asbestos work
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (7/13/2009): Clarification on number of employees required for glovebag removal operations
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (7/10/2008): Refresher training requirements for Class III asbestos work and training for excavations disturbing soil with ACM
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (9/5/2005): Building owner's requirement to determine and communicate the hazards from installed ACM and PACM
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (2/1/2005): Definition of "regulated area"
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (11/24/2003): Compliance requirements for renovation work involving material containing less than 1% asbestos
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (10/27/2003): Application of construction standard to demolition operations involving material less than 1% asbestos
The purpose of this document is to outline particular technical approaches and methods to help EPA analysts (including economists, risk assessors, and others) analyze potential environmental justice concerns for regulatory actions.
Use this Tips and Considerations guide with regulatory considerations and written Plan tips to help you customize the prewritten HAZWOPER Health and Safety Plan.
Checklists:
This environmental HAZWOPER checklist “List of Substance-Specific OSHA Standards” can be used to audit health and safety requirements at your facility. Download this HAZWOPER sample list to your computer or print it out. Updated with silica.
I understand that for "Specific" Secondary Containment, it is required to have sufficient additional capacity for precipitation (24-hr 25-yr storm). Does this requirement for additional capacity for precipitation also apply for "General" Secondary Containment cases such as pipelines?
Updated Documents
Forms:
As of December 12, 2015, MCS-150 forms can ONLY be used to update an existing US DOT number, not for initial registration with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. First-time applicants must use the Unified Registration System (URS). This form can be used until September 30, 2016 at which point it will be replaced by the URS.
Guidance Documents:
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (2/10/2015): Medical Surveillance for workers performing Class III asbestos work
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (12/1/2009): Drilling through asbestos-containing floor tile
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (6/12/2009): Comprehensive asbestos building surveys
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (3/1/2007): Clarification of decontamination procedures for employees involved in Class I asbestos work
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (7/13/2009): Clarification on number of employees required for glovebag removal operations
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (7/10/2008): Refresher training requirements for Class III asbestos work and training for excavations disturbing soil with ACM
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (9/5/2005): Building owner's requirement to determine and communicate the hazards from installed ACM and PACM
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (2/1/2005): Definition of "regulated area"
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (11/24/2003): Compliance requirements for renovation work involving material containing less than 1% asbestos
OSHA Letter of Interpretation (10/27/2003): Application of construction standard to demolition operations involving material less than 1% asbestos
The purpose of this document is to outline particular technical approaches and methods to help EPA analysts (including economists, risk assessors, and others) analyze potential environmental justice concerns for regulatory actions.
Use this Tips and Considerations guide with regulatory considerations and written Plan tips to help you customize the prewritten HAZWOPER Health and Safety Plan.
Staying in compliance with environmental regulations is an ongoing, and, at times, daunting task. Occasionally, things may slip through the cracks and expose your facility to potential enforcement actions by the EPA or state regulatory agency. This report will evaluate the pros and cons of conducting an environmental compliance audit, explain the criteria by which an audit should be conducted, and review the process for disclosing, via EPA’s online “e-disclosure” tool, any violations discovered during the course of an environmental compliance audit.
This document is an overview of the requirements of OSHA's Construction Industry Asbestos Standard. You must consult the standard for the specifics of the requirements for each class.
One of the most tedious parts of an EHS manager's job is keeping track of numerous records. This special report is a compilation of recordkeeping checklists designed to keep the EHS manager organized. This report covers a wide range of EHS topics including: air, asbestos, chemicals, electrical safety, HAZWOPER, lead, waste, water, and more.
The purpose of this EPA memorandum is to establish EPA policy on the effect of OSHA's reinterpretation of the retail exemption under the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard.
Regulatory Analysis:
This topic covers the labeling requirements of OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom), including the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) amendments, which applies to any employer whose workers may be exposed to hazardous chemicals. Manufacturers must label every hazardous chemical container with key information on the substance it contains, and worker training must include an explanation of the labeling system.

This analysis describes the requirements of safety data sheets (SDSs) under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) hazard communication standard—or HazCom. The SDS is at the heart of federal HazCom, and any employer with employees exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous chemicals must comply. The SDS is a detailed, written description of a hazardous chemical. It is the primary source of information about hazardous chemicals for employers and their workers, and it contains comprehensive technical information about a particular chemical and explains the hazards, precautions, and remedies to human exposure.

Employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous chemicals must be trained how to access SDSs and interpret them. SDSs must be readily available to employees in their work areas. SDSs are not substitutes to chemical labeling or worker training.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) was formed in April 1967 and consists of several administrations representing the various transportation modes. The Department serves as the focal point in the federal government for the coordinated National Transportation Policy. The DOT is responsible for transportation safety improvements and enforcement, international transportation agreements, and the continuity of transportation services in the public interest. The Department also prepares and proposes all legislation relating to transportation, coordinates transportation issues with other concerned agencies, and provides technical assistance to the states and cities in support of transportation programs and objectives.
Drinking water in the United States is regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which is designed to protect drinking water quality and covers both surface and groundwaters that have the potential to be used as drinking water sources. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the authority to establish and update specific standards for drinking water quality and is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The EPA has established specific federal limits, referred to as primary standards, for over 80 compounds that have a known or suspected potential to create health-related impacts. The EPA has also established secondary standards for nuisance-related contaminants; these standards are typically implemented voluntarily or through state rules.
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