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Regulatory Activity
Stay up to date with regulatory information in your state. Here's where you can see all the final and proposed rules, and notices published in the federal and state registers within the last 7 days.
Recent Regulatory Activity
New Documents
News:
Attorneys general (AGs) from 16 states are asking both houses of Congress to reject legislation that would amend the Clean Air Act (CAA) by rolling back EPA’s authority to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone.
Under an Executive Order (EO) from President Donald Trump, federal lands protected over the past 20 years under the 1906 Antiquities Act—signed into law by President Theodore Roosevelt—will get a fresh review by the Department of the Interior (DOI).
The Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Nevada, a project essentially abandoned by the Obama administration, would get a new infusion of funding in President Donald Trump’s Budget Blueprint.
In a Legal Sidebar, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) notes that President Donald Trump’s Executive Order (EO) Promoting Energy Independence and Economic Growth (EO 13783) may not free the EPA and other federal agencies from all consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change in their restructuring of federal regulations.
Servicing and maintaining equipment is dangerous business, causing up to 50,000 injuries and 120 fatalities, including electrocution, burns, crush injuries, cuts, lacerations, amputations, and fractures, each year. On this episode of EHS on Tap, Dave Galt, BLR Senior Legal Editor, discusses pressing lockout/tagout issues.
The EPA recently held a public hearing to receive comments on the Agency’s proposed denial (January 19, 2017, FR) of a petition to add nine states to the Clean Air Act’s (CAA) ozone transport region (OTR).
Given that as Oklahoma’s attorney general, he led a legal challenge against the Clean Power Plan (CPP), is EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt ethically qualified to undertake an objective review of the rule?
Administrator Scott Pruitt’s still young EPA has already established that it will act aggressively both to delay defending in court and to reconsider significant rules issued by the Obama EPA. The EPA recently took two significant actions.
Somewhat reluctantly, the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit granted a request from the EPA to delay oral arguments in the major legal challenge against the Agency’s 2015 revision of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone.
The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has petitioned the EPA to adopt more stringent emissions standards for locomotives.
Senator Tom Carper (DE), the Democrat’s top environmental spokesperson in the Senate, reacted with “incredulity” to a story in Politico indicating that the EPA was exploring the possibility of having the private sector participate in rewriting the Clean Water Rule (CWR).
In response to petitions from the Utility Water Act Group (UWAG) and the Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy (SBA), EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced that the Agency will reconsider its November 3, 2015, final Effluent Limitations Guidelines and Standards for the Steam Electric Power Generating Point Source Category (ELGs).
Environmental audits can be great tools to help assess compliance liabilities and provide a basis for minimizing liabilities by bringing to light areas of noncompliance. On this episode of EHS on Tap, Doug Ruhlin, environmental and sustainability consultant and owner of Resource Management Associates, discusses how to keep environmental audits manageable so that they can be an efficient, useful tool.
Supporting coal mining through elimination of federal rules that hamper growth may be the biggest environmental deregulatory strategy so far advanced by the Trump administration.
White Papers:
The Environmental Council of the States (ECOS) recently issued a resolution asking the EPA to use its authority under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to address the health and environmental hazards associated with the prevalence of lead wheel balancing weights in the United States.
Based on a 9-month investigation that concluded in November 2016, EPA’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) believes there is no way to determine if the EPA is addressing those leaking underground storage tanks (LUSTs) on Indian land that pose the highest risks to the environment and particularly to underground sources of drinking water.
Included among the 19 “independent” foundations, corporations, commissions, endowments, and institutes that would get zero funding under President Donald Trump’s Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Blueprint (http://bit.ly/2nvjrBO) is the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).
Guidance Documents:
The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for complying with provisions applicable to the transport by air of lithium batteries as set out in the 58th edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. Specifically the document provides information on: • Definitions; • Classification (including classification flowcharts); • Prohibitions; • Restrictions; • Frequently Asked Questions • Additional Information • Abbreviations, Acronyms, Symbols
This BLR table can be used to see if your state manages universal wastes that are in addition to those managed under the federal universal waste rule.
Checklists:
Use this BLR checklist to evaluate your wetlands planning project and to determine the steps necessary to comply with applicable regulations.
Updated Documents
Forms:
This link provides access to EPA's 2017 Construction General Permit, along with all accompanying appendices, including the Notice of Intent and the Notice of Termination.
Guidance Documents:
The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for complying with provisions applicable to the transport by air of lithium batteries as set out in the 58th edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. Specifically the document provides information on: • Definitions; • Classification (including classification flowcharts); • Prohibitions; • Restrictions; • Frequently Asked Questions • Additional Information • Abbreviations, Acronyms, Symbols
This BLR table can be used to see if your state manages universal wastes that are in addition to those managed under the federal universal waste rule.
This regulatory impact assessment prepared for the EPA presents EPA's analysis of the costs, benefits, and economic impact of the final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule.
Use this table to find the regulatory location of continuing and new regulations for hazardous waste generators as revised by the 2016 Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (effective May 30, 2017).
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
This guidance document is the Enviro.BLR.com national regulatory analysis for this topic that is in effect until May 30, 2017, when the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule becomes effective. For those states that have not yet revised their regulations to reflect the 2017 federal changes, this document serves the purpose of describing the federal requirements that remain in effect until the state revises its regulations.
Use this chart to check your state’s air emissions inventory reporting requirements and find contact information.
Review this table to see if your state requires an annual report, quarterly report, or monthly report in addition to the Biennial Report.
Regulatory Analysis:

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

The regulation of wetlands in the United States involves a variety of regulatory schemes, including the Section 404 regulation for the discharge of dredged or fill material into waters of the United States under the Clean Water Act (CWA). In general, activities including placement of fill material, excavation, levee construction, land clearing or leveling, as well as road and dam construction projects, all require a wetlands permit under the CWA. For every authorized discharge under a wetlands permit, the adverse impacts to wetlands, streams, and other aquatic resources must be avoided and minimized to the extent practicable. For unavoidable impacts, compensatory mitigation is required to replace the loss of wetland and aquatic resource functions in the watershed.
When stormwater drains from a construction site, it carries sediment and other pollutants associated with the site that can harm lakes, streams, and wetlands. Controlling erosion from construction sites can significantly reduce the amount of sedimentation and other pollutants transported by stormwater runoff associated with construction activities.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

Required by both the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a hazardous waste manifest is the shipping paper for hazardous waste. The paper manifest travels with the hazardous waste from the point of generation, through transportation, to the final treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF). Each party in the chain of shipping, including the generator, signs and keeps a manifest copy, creating a "cradle to grave" tracking of the hazardous waste. Hazardous waste shipments offered for transportation by a generator and shipped to a TSDF may, alternatively, be tracked with an electronic manifest.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

On May 30, 2017, the U.S. EPA final Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Rule (New Rule) goes into effect in states and territories without a RCRA-authorized hazardous waste program (Alaska, Iowa, the Indian Nations, and the territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands). RCRA-authorized states must adopt the more stringent provisions of the New Rule by July 1, 2019, at the latest.

Appropriate changes have been made to the BLR federal regulatory analysis for this and other topics affected by the New Rule. Changes to parallel state regulatory analyses will be made as states revise their regulations to comply with the New Rule. Until then, RCRA-authorized states will follow their current state hazardous waste regulations. The Critical 2017/2018 Hazardous Waste Generator Information in this national topic provides essential guidance on the currently applicable state regulations.

Responsibility for the various actions that make up the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) enforcement program is divided among different offices, EPA regions, and state agencies.
The CWA is the main federal law in the United States that addresses water pollution, and includes the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), which grants federal permits to operations that discharge to the waters of the United States, and Section 404, which enables the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to grant permits for certain activities within waterways and wetlands.
The September 11 attacks increased concerns that terrorists might target businesses that handle hazardous materials, such as chemical manufacturers. While site security at these facilities previously targeted the isolated intruder or vandal, 9/11 highlighted the possibility that chemicals might be released or stolen as international weaponry. Site protection was suddenly entwined with national security, leading both legislators and the industry to step forward and address this threat.
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