Log in to view your state's edition
You are not logged in
State:
Recent Updates Sent to Your Inbox
Latest What's New E-mail
Regulatory Activity
Stay up to date with regulatory information in your state. Here's where you can see all the final and proposed rules, and notices published in the federal and state registers within the last 7 days.
Recent Regulatory Activity
New Documents
News:

While the 2015 Definition of Solid Waste (DSW) final rule adds many requirements that significantly impact HSM recycling activities, it does not extend its regulatory reach to affect certain recycling activities that have enjoyed exclusions or conditional exemptions from RCRA regulation for many years (and in some cases, decades).

As directed in President Obama’s June 2013 Climate Action Plan, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced its Clean Power Plan (CPP) to reduce carbon emissions from existing electric power plants. The final rule includes significant changes to the June 2014 proposal, which prompted 4.3 million public comments.
Taking its cue from the U.S. Supreme Court’s April 2014 ruling (EME Homer City Generation v. EPA), a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit unanimously remanded core provisions of EPA’s 2011 Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR or Transport Rule).
In a brief letter and report, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) said the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers (EPA/Corps) complied with their statutorily required procedural steps in promulgating their momentous Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule.
n a final rule pursuant to the 2006 Pipeline Inspection, Protection, Enforcement, and Safety (PIPES) Act, the Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) has codified the criteria it will use to determine the adequacy of state actions to enforce programs to prevent pipeline damage from excavations.
A bill that would prevent the EPA from changing its mind about how to regulate coal combustion residuals (CCRs) passed in the House by a vote of 258 to 166.
The EPA is moving to add six “biodiesel components” to the list of substances that are partially exempt from the processing and use reporting requirements of the chemical data reporting (CDR) rule.
The Texas Public Policy Foundation, which describes itself as “a non-profit, non-partisan research institute,” unveiled its “interstate power compact,” wherein states can join together to oppose any final requirements imposed on them by EPA’s upcoming Clean Power Plan (CPP).
In a direct final rule effective January 19, 2016, the EPA is requiring use of an updated version of its electronic software for submitting premanufacture notice (PMN) and significant new use information required by Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

Many states add requirements to their hazardous waste container regulations that are in addition to the federal requirements. Do you know where to find them?

The next presidential election is still 16 months away, but given that there are 12 announced candidates for the Republican nomination, and probably several more who will join the race, it is not too early to start looking at where they stand on environmental and energy issues.
White Papers:
Within a period of less than 6 months, the EPA is expected to issue four major rules that, the Agency says, will have extraordinary benefits for the environment and public health. Business representatives respond that the four actions will also have powerful direct, indirect, and interrelated negative consequences for the U.S. economy.
Guidance Documents:
This comparison chart details the recent regulatory changes EPA made to the Clean Water Act's definition of "Waters of the U.S." (WOTUS).
This special report will help guide the regulated community through EPA's new regulations for underground storage tanks (USTs). The new regulations come packed with operator training, monthly walkthrough inspections, and secondary containment requirements. This special report will help any UST owner and operator comprehend and transition through the updated regs.
This letter discusses who meets the definition of "hazmat employee" including persons who perform duties that are regulated under the hazardous materials regulations and persons who, in the normal course of their employment, perform or manage the work of those performing such duties.
This chart provides a side-by-side comparison of EPA's 2008 MSGP regulations and the updated 2015 MSGP's regulations.
This chart compares the 1988 and the 2015 regulations in detail. Users can view the 1988 regulatory topics and citations and compare them with EPA's recent revisions.
This 3 page EPA fact sheet illustrates the facts for the revised definition of the Waters of the U.S.
This 2 page fact sheet provides users with the basic facts of the Clean Water Rule's revised definition of the Waters of the U.S.
Farmers and ranchers should refer to this EPA fact sheet on the specific impacts the Clean Water Rule's updated definition of the Waters of the U.S. have on agriculture.
Those involved in manufacturing, farming, tourism, and recreation and others should refer to this EPA fact sheet on the specific impacts the Clean Water Rule's new definition on Waters of the U.S. will have on businesses.
Community members should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the basics of how the Clean Water Rule's revised definition of the Waters of the U.S. will impact the community.
Developers should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the basics of the Clean Water Rule's revision of the Waters of the U.S. definition.
Members of local governments should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the impacts of the Clean Water Rule's revision of the Waters of the U.S. definition.
Recreational users should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn about the impacts the Clean Water Rule's revision of the Waters of the U.S. will impact recreational activities.
Utility facilities should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the impacts the Clean Water Rule's revised Waters of the U.S. will have on utilities.
This EPA technical support document addresses in more detail the legal basis and the existing scientific literature in support of the significant nexus determinations underpinning the Clean Water Rule. The Preamble, the Science Report, this Technical Support Document, the Response to Comments, and the rest of the administrative record provide the basis for the definition of “waters of the United States” established in the rule.
Do you find yourself meandering through the EPA and Corps' revised definition of "waters of the U.S." (WOTUS)? Use this flow diagram to help determine whether a water meets the new definition of WOTUS.
Questions & Answers:
I have a question regarding the current management of oil absorbent pads at my facility AND the way I propose to start managing them in the future. Current Day: during the manufacturing process—transformers are filled with non PCB mineral oil and in about 20% of the transformers a vegetable based oil (FR3). See msds for the FR3 and the WEMCO mineral oil and the oil absorbent pads. If/when some of the oil is sloshed about on the manufacturing floor (no drains are anywhere near)—the employee used oil absorbent pads to clean up the mess and then place the pads in a 55 gallon metal drum. These drums are then collected and the pads are baled (similar to cardboard) and then managed as special waste. Proposed Path forward: I am working to a zero waste to landfill initiative and plan to begin placing the pads in the trash compactor with cardboard and normal refuse and then sending the entire contents to a waste to energy facility (i.e Covanta). I have submitted all the fo
Are direct supervisors of dock workers (who are hazmat employees) also considered to be hazmat employees for purposes of training? If so, how far up the chain of command does the training requirement go?
Is it safe to say that the RCRA regulations regulating recyclable materials from which precious metals are reclaimed have not been affected by the 2015 DSW Final Rule?
Updated Documents
Forms:
The primary purpose of this federal notification form is to provide information about the installation, existence, changes to, and closure of underground storage tank systems (USTs) that store or have stored petroleum or hazardous substances. The information you provide will be based on reasonably available records, or in the absence of such records, your knowledge or recollection.
The primary purpose of this notification form is to inform implementing agencies of ownership changes for underground storage tank (UST) systems that store or have stored petroleum or hazardous substances. This form is for USTs in states that do not have permitting authority.
Facility applicants seeking coverage under the 2015 MSGP for stormwater discharges associated with industrial activity within the "critical area" of endangered or threatened species or critical habitat must complete and submit this form 30 days before submitting the NOI.
Guidance Documents:
This comparison chart details the recent regulatory changes EPA made to the Clean Water Act's definition of "Waters of the U.S." (WOTUS).
This special report will help guide the regulated community through EPA's new regulations for underground storage tanks (USTs). The new regulations come packed with operator training, monthly walkthrough inspections, and secondary containment requirements. This special report will help any UST owner and operator comprehend and transition through the updated regs.
This letter discusses who meets the definition of "hazmat employee" including persons who perform duties that are regulated under the hazardous materials regulations and persons who, in the normal course of their employment, perform or manage the work of those performing such duties.
This chart provides a side-by-side comparison of EPA's 2008 MSGP regulations and the updated 2015 MSGP's regulations.
This chart compares the 1988 and the 2015 regulations in detail. Users can view the 1988 regulatory topics and citations and compare them with EPA's recent revisions.
This 3 page EPA fact sheet illustrates the facts for the revised definition of the Waters of the U.S.
This 2 page fact sheet provides users with the basic facts of the Clean Water Rule's revised definition of the Waters of the U.S.
Farmers and ranchers should refer to this EPA fact sheet on the specific impacts the Clean Water Rule's updated definition of the Waters of the U.S. have on agriculture.
Those involved in manufacturing, farming, tourism, and recreation and others should refer to this EPA fact sheet on the specific impacts the Clean Water Rule's new definition on Waters of the U.S. will have on businesses.
Community members should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the basics of how the Clean Water Rule's revised definition of the Waters of the U.S. will impact the community.
Developers should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the basics of the Clean Water Rule's revision of the Waters of the U.S. definition.
Members of local governments should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the impacts of the Clean Water Rule's revision of the Waters of the U.S. definition.
Recreational users should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn about the impacts the Clean Water Rule's revision of the Waters of the U.S. will impact recreational activities.
Utility facilities should refer to this EPA fact sheet to learn the impacts the Clean Water Rule's revised Waters of the U.S. will have on utilities.
This EPA technical support document addresses in more detail the legal basis and the existing scientific literature in support of the significant nexus determinations underpinning the Clean Water Rule. The Preamble, the Science Report, this Technical Support Document, the Response to Comments, and the rest of the administrative record provide the basis for the definition of “waters of the United States” established in the rule.
Do you find yourself meandering through the EPA and Corps' revised definition of "waters of the U.S." (WOTUS)? Use this flow diagram to help determine whether a water meets the new definition of WOTUS.
This EPA work plan describes the actions that the National Water Program is planning to take in 2015 to implement the National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its most recent final permit for stormwater discharges associated with industrial activities, the Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP). This chart compares the 2015 permit and the preceding 2008 permit.
EPA published final updated ambient water quality criteria for the protection of human health for 94 chemical pollutants. These updated recommendations reflect the latest scientific information and EPA policies, including updated body weight, drinking water consumption rate, fish consumption rate, bioaccumulation factors, health toxicity values, and relative source contributions.
This comparison chart distinguishes the pollutants for the updated human health water quality criteria from previous water quality requirements.
This table summarizes EPA's updated water quality values for the 2015 final human health criteria.
This document provides technical information to regulatory personnel from the EPA and state, tribal, and local agencies for investigating and assessing petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) at sites where petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) have been released from underground storage tanks (USTs).
This is a comparison table outlining the similarities and differences between the 1988 UST regulations and the new 2015 regulations
This booklet describes the 2015 revised federal UST regulation. If your UST systems are located in a state without state program approval, the requirements in this booklet and the state requirements apply to you.
The EPA published this notice in the Federal Register notifying industrial facilities that the 2015 MSGP for stormwater discharges associated with industrial activities is now final.
This EPA Fact Sheet accompanies the 2015 MSGP for Stormwater discharges that went into effect June 4, 2015.
Industrial facility managers should use this quick EPA 2 page fact sheet as guidance for the updated 2015 industrial stormwater permit.
This document is intended for use at any site being evaluated by EPA pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, or the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended; it is also intended for use by EPA’s brownfield grantees, or state agencies acting pursuant to CERCLA or an authorized RCRA corrective action program where vapor intrusion may be of potential concern. It is applicable to both residential and non-residential settings.
This document is intended for use at any site subject to petroleum contamination from underground storage tanks where vapor intrusion may be of potential concern. It is applicable to both residential and non-residential settings.
This fact sheet breaks down the complexities of the EPA and Corps' recent rule redefining "waters of the U.S." and identifies frequently asked questions on what the rule changed and its implications.
This draft report published by the EPA reviews, analyzes, and synthesizes information relevant to the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources at each stage of the hydraulic fracturing water cycle.
This chart summarizes the federal regulations for managing solvent-contaminated wipes under 40 CFR 261.4(a)(26), which conditionally excludes from the definition of solid waste, solvent-contaminated wipes that are cleaned and reused (“reusable wipes”), and under 40 CFR 261.4(b)(18), which conditionally excludes from the definition of hazardous waste, solvent-contaminated wipes that are disposed (“disposable wipes”).
This EPA and Army Corps of Engineers fact sheet details the key aspects of the final definitional rule for 'Waters of the U.S.' also known as the Clean Water Rule.
This Technical Support Document addresses in more detail the legal basis and the existing scientific literature in support of the significant nexus determinations underpinning the Clean Water Rule.
The agencies prepared this illustrative economic analysis to show how the scope of this new regulation compares to the historic practices under the existing regulation and to the agencies’ recent field practices in making jurisdictional determinations after the Supreme Court decisions of 2001 and 2006. This summary describes the overall approach and presents the key results from the economic analysis.
Use this chart to check your state’s TRI reporting requirements and find contact information.
This fact sheet provides guidance for persons who may be subject to the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule and provides information about regulatory reporting thresholds that are applicable to the 2016 reporting period.
EPA published in the Federal Register TSCA Section 8(e) Policy Statement on March 16, 1978.
This "Reporting Guide" has been compiled by EPA's Office of Toxic Substances (OTS) to assist potential respondents who manufacture, import, process or distribute chemical substances in complying with Section 8(e).
EPA is announcing that notifications of substantial risk under section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and voluntary For Your Information (FYI) submissions may now be filed electronically using EPA's electronic document submission system, the Central Data Exchange (CDX). Use of this electronic reporting option will streamline and reduce the administrative costs and burdens of submitting paper-based notifications of substantial risks and FYI submissions.
EPA is updating its list of existing chemicals for assessment under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); this is known as the TSCA Work Plan for Chemical Assessments. The changes to the TSCA Work Plan for Chemical Assessments reflect updated industry data submitted to EPA through the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) in 2011 and the TSCA Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) requirements in 2012 on chemical releases and potential exposures.
This discussion guide is intended to be used to help structure public input during the September 2011 webinar and discussion forum addressing the prioritization factors and data sources EPA plans to use to identify priority chemicals for review and assessment under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).
This fact sheet provides guidance for people who may be subject to the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule on how their requirements for reporting for 2016 may be affected when chemical substances are the subject of certain TSCA actions.
EPA developed this brochure to help UST owners and operators in Indian country comply with the federal UST regulations.
EPA is providing this information as a resource for states developing new third-party inspection programs or enhancing their existing programs.
This document provides guidance to State and EPA personnel in understanding and reviewing financial responsibility documentation used to comply with the Federal financial responsibility regulations [40 CFR Part 280, Subpart H].
This EPA fact sheet explains what you can expect during an EPA inspection including what an inspector will be looking for and what may happen afterwards
If you own a Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO), you have probably heard about EPA's inspection and enforcement activities. These activities are part of an increased national emphasis aimed at ending harmful discharges of pollutants from CAFOs into rivers and streams. Use these tips to help prepare your CAFO for an inspection.
EPA proposes changes to pollutant analysis methods that are used by industries and municipalities to analyze the chemical, physical, and biological components of wastewater and other environmental samples that are required by regulations under the Clean Water Act.
EPA proposes specific changes to analytical test procedures that are used by industries and municipalities to analyze the chemical, physical, and biological components of wastewater and other environmental samples that are required by regulations under the Clean Water Act.
The Environmental Protection Agency is establishing Federal drinking water requirements (known as national primary drinking water regulations or (NPDWRs) for aircraft public water systems (hereafter, aircraft water systems) under the Safe drinking Water Act (SDWA).
This fact sheet helps users understand the Final Aircraft Drinking Water Rule.
This Quick Reference Guide published by the EPA helps ensure that safe and reliable drinking water is provided to aircraft passengers and crew by amending and consolidating National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for aircraft public water systems (PWSs).
This EPA Guide discusses the importance of controlling cross-connections and preventing backflow occurrences from unprotected cross-connections in the water system and is intended for owners and operators of all public water systems serving fewer than 10,000 persons.
This progress report presents the research progress made by the EPA, as of September 2012, regarding the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources; information presented as part of this report cannot be used to draw conclusions about the proposed research questions.
Regulatory Analysis:
Toxic air pollutants, also known as HAPs, are those pollutants that are known or suspected to cause cancer, other serious health effects, or adverse environmental effects. Other health effects can include damage to the immune system, as well as neurological, reproductive, developmental, respiratory, and other health problems.
In 1984, Congress responded to the increasing threat to groundwater posed by leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) by adding Subtitle I to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), through the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, creating a federal program to regulate USTs containing petroleum and hazardous chemicals to limit corrosion and structural defects. The federal UST program also established operating requirements and technical standards for tank design and installation, leak detection, spill and overfill control, corrective action, and tank closure.
The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires hazardous waste large quantity generators (LQGs) and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) to report every 2 years on the quantities, type, and management method of hazardous wastes generated on-site and hazardous wastes received from off-site sources. Referred to by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the Hazardous Waste Report (EPA Form 8700-13 A/B), and by those in the environmental management field as the Biennial Report, the report must be submitted by March 1 of every even-numbered year with information of the facility's hazardous waste activities during the previous odd-numbered calendar year.
The regulation of wetlands in the United States involves a variety of regulatory schemes, including the Section 404 regulation for the discharge of dredged or fill material into waters of the United States under the Clean Water Act (CWA). In general, activities including placement of fill material, excavation, levee construction, land clearing or leveling, as well as road and dam construction projects, all require a wetlands permit under the CWA. For every authorized discharge under a wetlands permit, the adverse impacts to wetlands, streams, and other aquatic resources must be avoided and minimized to the extent practicable. For unavoidable impacts, compensatory mitigation is required to replace the loss of wetland and aquatic resource functions in the watershed.
Lead is a naturally occurring bluish-gray metal found in small amounts in the earth's crust. It has no characteristic taste or smell. Metallic lead does not dissolve in water and does not burn. Lead can combine with other chemicals to form what are usually known as lead salts. Some natural and manufactured substances contain lead, but do not look like lead in its metallic form.
Energy generation and the environment will always be very closely linked. The extraction and utilization of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, to meet our nation's energy demands have significant impacts on our environment. In an effort to mitigate those impacts, regulations have been or are being established, and viable, sustainable energy alternatives are being developed.
Waste management requirements include leak detection standards as a safeguard to preventing spills, releases, and contamination. In general, leak detection rules require that a leak detection device be installed on a storage or disposal unit. Leak detection should be part of the overall system design. The specific leak detection system standards vary, depending on the type of unit or facility. Leak detection requirements can be related to both liquid discharges and air emissions.
Making a hazardous waste determination is the key to the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management regulations. One of the most frequently asked questions by generators is, "Is my waste a hazardous waste regulated under RCRA?" If the answer is "no," the RCRA hazardous waste laws and regulations do not apply to the management of that waste. If the answer is "yes," however, the generator and subsequent handlers of the hazardous waste must comply with myriad RCRA rules that are in place in order to ensure the safe management of the hazardous waste.
Under the Clean Water Act (CWA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that regulated oil storage facilities develop and implement oil Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. In addition to the CWA requirements, the federal Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA) requires that facilities detail and implement spill prevention and control measures in their plans.
Added in the last 7 days
Updated in the last 14 days

Environmental Quick Links

 
eco
Codie
 
 
• Only Section 12 ecological information
• Sections 12 through 15 because other agencies regulate this information
• Sections 9 through 12 because other agencies regulate this information
 
CT-WEB01