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Regulatory Activity
Stay up to date with regulatory information in your state. Here's where you can see all the final and proposed rules, and notices published in the federal and state registers within the last 7 days.
Recent Regulatory Activity
New Documents
Audio Presentations:
For most healthy adults, seasonal viruses are not generally life-threatening. But as you’ve seen in the news, acute respiratory illness pandemics, such as those caused by coronaviruses or influenza, can spread quickly and widely and pose a major global health threat. The main objective of this course is to make non-healthcare workers aware of the risks of pandemics and the precautions to take to keep themselves safe. By the time the session is over, you will be able to describe what a pandemic is; identify types of viruses that can cause acute respiratory illness pandemics and recognize their symptoms; appreciate the risks of infection; prevent the spread of infection; prepare for and address a pandemic at work and at home; and react responsibly if you get sick.
News:
The EPA issued a final rule amending the CDR requirements under Section 8(a) of the TSCA which includes making regulatory updates that align with new statutory requirements contained in the 2016 TSCA Amendments, improving the CDR data collected to support the implementation of TSCA, and reducing the burden for certain CDR reporters.
The EPA's Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA) has issued a "temporary" policy outlining the Agency's approach to civil enforcement during the COVID-19 pandemic. Generally, says the EPA, it will exercise its "enforcement discretion" during the pandemic "if regulated entities take the steps applicable to their situations."
A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit found that an EPA directive that recast procedures for selecting members for the Agency's 22 science committees violated federal law.
The EPA concluded that no new emissions limits need to be set because the emissions limits established in the 2003 NESHAP protect public health. Although the review found three developments in practices, processes, and control technologies that could result in reduced emissions from landfills, none of the three developments met its criteria for cost-effectiveness.
As the world grapples with the coronavirus pandemic, an environmental concern has been raised relating to the surge in use of disinfectant wipes and their disposal in toilet bowls. Environmental agencies around the country are exhorting the public not to flush these items because they do not readily decompose and can create blockages and other problems along the entire wastewater disposal system.
The EPA has stepped forward with a second proposal governing the Agency's use of science at the Agency. The action supplements the EPA's April 2018 proposal, Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science. That proposal would ensure that when developing regulations, the EPA would rely on only data that are publicly available in a manner sufficient for independent validation.
White Papers:
In its FY 2018-2022 Strategic Plan, the EPA stated that it wants to make 255 additional Superfund sites and 3,420 additional brownfield sites ready for anticipated use by September 2022. Since then, the EPA has issued many documents explaining its obligations under federal law regarding liability, and policies it has established to encourage remediation and economic recovery while ensuring that the public's interest is protected. One topic of particular relevance to the taxpayer is the EPA's policy on windfall liens.
Guidance Documents:
This chart provides information on the stance state regulatory agencies are taking with respect to regulatory compliance, recordkeeping, and reporting deadlines during the COVID-19 pandemic, when employees of regulatory agencies and within the regulated community are being encouraged or required to work remotely, and absenteeism may be increased due to illness.
This infographic can be posted in your facility to apprise employees of COVID-19 symptoms, preventative measures, and what to do if they get sick.
Forms:
this form to evaluate training exercises that test the overall effectiveness of your plan's procedures before an actual disaster situation occurs.
This form can be used at your facility to maintain your list of contacts during an emergency.
Use this form to record important contact information for government agencies and other organizations in case of emergency.
This form can be used to list the names and contact information for key personnel at your facility.
This policy can be used in an employee handbook or as a standalone policy addressing emergency planning and response issues in the workplace.
Use this form as a template to develop an agreement with employees who telecommute or work remotely.
Checklists:
This checklist will allow you to quickly evaluate whether your organization is taking appropriate actions to address the COVID-19 pandemic within your workplace.
Updated Documents
Forms:
this form to evaluate training exercises that test the overall effectiveness of your plan's procedures before an actual disaster situation occurs.
This form can be used at your facility to maintain your list of contacts during an emergency.
Use this form to record important contact information for government agencies and other organizations in case of emergency.
This form can be used to list the names and contact information for key personnel at your facility.
This policy can be used in an employee handbook or as a standalone policy addressing emergency planning and response issues in the workplace.
Use this form as a template to develop an agreement with employees who telecommute or work remotely.
Guidance Documents:
This chart provides information on the stance state regulatory agencies are taking with respect to regulatory compliance, recordkeeping, and reporting deadlines during the COVID-19 pandemic, when employees of regulatory agencies and within the regulated community are being encouraged or required to work remotely, and absenteeism may be increased due to illness.
This infographic can be posted in your facility to apprise employees of COVID-19 symptoms, preventative measures, and what to do if they get sick.
The 2020 EHS Salary Guide will help you evaluate how your compensation compares to others with similar titles in your location and nationwide. In addition, EHS managers can use the information to keep their departments competitive and efficient—an easy way to guarantee you are paying the right amount to retain hard-to-fill positions but not overpaying on others.
Does your facility need to file a Hazardous Waste Biennial Report? This infographic helps you decide and provides useful tips for preparing and submitting a Biennial Report.
Regulatory Analysis:
The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires hazardous waste large quantity generators (LQGs) and TSDFs to report every 2 years on the quantities, type, and management method of hazardous wastes generated on-site and hazardous wastes received from off-site sources. Referred to by the EPA as the Hazardous Waste Report (EPA Form 8700-13 A/B), and by those in the environmental management field as the Biennial Report, the report must be submitted by March 1 of every even-numbered year with information of the facility's hazardous waste activities during the previous odd-numbered calendar year. Some states require generators and TSDFs to submit an annual hazardous waste report in addition to, or in lieu of, the federal Biennial Report. Many of the state regulatory agencies will use these annual reports to complete a facility's federal Biennial Report that the agency then sends to the EPA in order to fulfill the federal requirement.
In 1986, Congress began its overall hazardous release program by passing the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) as part of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. EPCRA requires facilities to report on the extremely hazardous chemicals used at the facility and notify state or local planning agencies if a release occurs. This provides the community and local emergency response agencies with information needed for the proper planning of an emergency release at that facility.
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